Reflections on Spring

Spring is here and everywhere around us nature is coming back to life after a long, cold winter.  It is great to see the flowers again and the blossom on the trees, it reminds us just how resilient these things are that they can survive the winter and start all over again as if for the first time.

Conversely though, they also remind us of the fragility of life.  We know that those flowers which look so bright and fresh today will soon start to fade and wither, and in a few weeks’ time will be gone altogether. 

In fact, the Psalmist in the Bible picks up on this and uses it as a metaphor for our lives.  In Psalm 103 we read

“As for man, his days are like grass;
As a flower of the field, so he flourishes.    For the wind passes over it, and it is gone,
And its place remembers it no more.
But the mercy of the LORD is from everlasting to everlasting
On those who fear Him.”                                                 
(Psalms 103:15-17, NKJV)

Just like the flowers come and go, so do we.  In the big scheme of things our lives are of no more consequence than that of the humblest daisy.  In a hundred years from now who will even remember that we were here? 

These reflections may seem rather melancholy but notice the contrast that is there in the Psalm.  The shortness of our lives is compared with the mercy of God, not on every single person but on those who fear Him.  This is best understood in the light of wider Bible teaching that not everyone is saved simply because they exist.  Without God life is short and death is final.  But for those who do respect God and find forgiveness in His Son the story could not be more different.

He will remember them if they die and will raise them back to life when Jesus returns from heaven.  From there they go on to live forever in His kingdom, not in heaven but here on the earth.  The Bible has many amazing descriptions of this age to come, particularly in the book of Isaiah.  There we read

“For behold, I create new heavens and a new earth; And the former shall not be remembered or come to mind. . . For behold, I create Jerusalem as a rejoicing, And her people a joy . . . The voice of weeping shall no longer be heard in her, Nor the voice of crying. . . They shall not build and another inhabit; They shall not plant and another eat; For as the days of a tree, so shall be the days of My people.”       (Isaiah 65:17-22, NKJV)